Scrum Meeting Success for Distributed Teams

In a previous blog, I discussed ways to make distributed daily scrum meetings more effective. This blog reinforces those ideas and provides additional tips to run successful scrum meetings with geographically distributed teams.

Productive, timely, 15-minute Daily Scrum meetings, remain a challenge. As many practitioners will attest, co-located Daily Scrum meetings are nearly as challenging for some of the same reasons:

– Meetings go beyond 15 minutes

– Not everyone has a chance to be heard

– Conversations wander into resolutions and opinion

– Impediments are not captured and addressed

– Others interrupt

And more…

Holding team meetings where members are not in the same physical or mental space is quite challenging, and it becomes more so when the team is geographically distributed. As I mentioned previously, the initial rule of thumb was to breakdown the daily meeting into small deliverables and then focus on each part of the meeting. The overall Definition of Done is the teams take ownership of the Daily Scrum meeting and use this as a foundation/basis. This idea has evolved into a goal for Daily Scrum meetings of having the team take ownership and management of their daily meeting. With this, we can create “Definitions of Done” for each part of the meeting.

For example:

Part 1: The team listens to each other’s ‘questions 3’ with no interruptions.

– Definition of Done: each team member has an equal voice to state their answers and be heard by their team members.

Part 2: The ScrumMaster reads the impediments/issues they recorded and the team adds, corrects and confirms the list is correct

– Definition of Done: the ScrumMaster reads off the impediments and has the team approve them

Part 3: The participants in the Daily Scrum meeting organize additional conversations around the Sprint and the results of the Daily Scrum Meeting the team.

– Definition of Done: the team members self-organize and work on the issues at hand and have these groups communicate what they did before the next scrum meeting, to the rest of the team.

When it comes to implementation there‘s a way to execute this process. For example:.

The meeting begins with one team member (initially the ScrumMaster) asking a team member the ‘questions 3’.

– The team member identifies the task and the story they are working on. They describe at a high level what they are doing and how much more time they need to finish.

– The team member then describes what they plan on doing tomorrow. If they will be moving to a new task, they should state which task.

– The team member then states what issues/impediments/ concerns they have about getting the work done or completing the sprint..

– Team member #1 then asks another team member the ‘questions 3’. This is a sure way to transfer ownership of the meeting to the team.

This is not a ritual. It is a basic pattern of action that can be used to start off a new team, orient new team members and get a team back into a rhythm. I have found that getting back on track is a lot easier if there is a simple base or foundation to structure and define roles. From there, teams can quickly self-organize…and it works well when things get stressful!

Roles and Actions for the Daily Scrum

ScrumMasters don’t run the Daily Scrum – they guide the team to run it themselves. Their primary focus is to collect the impediment list and get it approved by the Team. There should be a task on the task board regarding impediments for reporting the status of impediments.

Team Members individually and collectively run the meeting.

The Product Owner should be there listening and ready to answer questions immediately after the meeting closes.

Anyone who has committed to deliver something to the team during the Sprint must have a task on the task board and attend and answer the questions 3. This includes Product Owners, stakeholders, and management.

Guidelines and Techniques for the Daily Scrum

1) Turn the meeting ownership over to the team by having each team member ask another member the ‘questions 3’. Since there is no pattern or set order when one team member asks another, people on phones pay attention because they do not know when the questions will come their way.

2) The ScrumMaster is the servant leader, helping the team stay focused on the conversation, the task board, and the questions. It’s surprising how quickly the rest of the team picks up on this focus and brings the more loquacious and “off tangent” teammates back on track by asking “what task are you talking about?” Some teams go as far as including a protocol statement in their team charter stating all questions in the daily Scrum meeting begin with the user story and the task.

3) At the end of the first part of the meeting, the ScrumMaster, who may have been taking notes on the impediments, begins the second portion of the meeting by going over the impediment list to see if any were missed. This action reinforces that this meeting is for the team and that all issues are visible and noted.

4) The third and final part is a call for the issues to be discussed immediately after the meeting. Any team member, including the Product Owner may ask for conversations on story or task issues.

5) As soon as that is sorted out, the ScrumMaster requests that all decisions resulting from the upcoming conversations be communicated before the next daily meeting.

6) The daily meeting is closed and the conversations continue. 


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